Home / Articles Posted by Christina S. Murrey (Page 4)

Dissemination-Implementation science has emerged over the past decade replete with conceptual models and studies of barriers to the successful implementation of evidence-based programs. This work has been of limited usefulness to state systems that are undergoing massive changes due to changes in the healthcare system. These changes target accountability, costs, and outcomes of state services. In the rush by state health and behavioral health authorities to accommodate these changes, services for children and adolescents are being largely overlooked. Yet ironically the most direct way to address system problems is through redesign of prevention and intervention services for children. This entails closing the gap between evidence-based care and its implementation in real world settings. A body of research is emerging that identifies system-level, organizational-level, and individual-level (child and family) interventions that can dramatically improve services and outcomes for children and adolescents. Approaches include evidence-based framing, strategic collaborative interventions, quality metrics, and data driven feedback systems. In her talk, Dr. Hoagwood will provide examples of each and recommend a research agenda to accelerate practical progress.

Dr. Kimberly Hoagwood is the Cathy and Stephen Graham Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry and the Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Hoagwood is the Director and Principal Investigator of the IDEAS Center, an Advanced Center on Implementation and Dissemination Science in States for Children and Families, located at New York University and funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). She also has a joint position with the division of Children, Youth and Families at the New York State Office of Behavioral health (NYSOMH) as a Research Scientist. Previously, Dr. Hoagwood was Professor of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry at Columbia University, where she served as the Acting Director of the Division of Services and Health Policy Research. Prior to her appointment at Columbia University, she was the Associate Director for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research at NIMH, overseeing the portfolio of research on child and adolescent behavioral health, and she served as the Scientific Editor for the Office of the Surgeon General’s National Action Agenda on Children’s Mental Health. She has continuously received federal and state funding over the course of her academic career, has published over 150 peer-reviewed research articles, and is the editor of numerous books on child behavioral health interventions and services research.

-Video by Texas Student Media

POST TAGS:

Undergraduate elementary education majors transform into teacher leaders through their experience at the College of Education. They leave the program prepared to teach in and partner with diverse, urban communities, where both students and teachers never stop learning.

Explore one such place you can go after graduation.

Thinking with Theory: A New Analytic for Qualitative Inquiry

Dr. Alecia Youngblood Jackson is Professor of Educational Research at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC – where she is also affiliated faculty in the Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies program at ASU. Dr. Jackson’s research interests bring feminist, poststructural, and posthuman theories of power/knowledge, language, materiality, and subjectivity to bear on a range of overlapping topics: deconstructions of narrative and voice; conceptual analyses of resistance, freedom, and agency in girls’ and women’s lives; and qualitative analysis in the “posts.” Her work, particularly in collaboration with Lisa Mazzei, seeks to animate philosophical frameworks in the production of the new. She was a keynote speaker at the Summer Institute for Qualitative Research at Manchester Metropolitan University in July 2013, and she was the invited speaker for Louisiana State University’s Curriculum Camp in February 2015. She has publications in The International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Qualitative Inquiry, The International Review of Qualitative Research, Qualitative Research, Gender and Education, and numerous book chapters. She is the author, with Lisa Mazzei, of Thinking with Theory in Qualitative Research (2012), and editor, with Lisa Mazzei, of Voice in Qualitative Inquiry (2009).

In my talk, I situate my collaborate work with Lisa Mazzei, which we call thinking with theory, not as a method with a script, but as a new analytic for qualitative inquiry. This new analytic works within and against the truths of humanist, conventional, and interpretive forms of inquiry and analysis that have centered and dominated qualitative research texts and practices. I will discuss how there is no formula for thinking with theory: it is something that is to come; something that happens, paradoxically, in a moment that has already happened; something emergent, unpredictable, and always re-thinkable and re-doable. Discussing his power/knowledge analysis, Foucault (2000) explained, “What I’ve written is never prescriptive either for me or for others — at most it’s instrumental and tentative” (p. 240). Following Foucault, I will argue that thinking with theory does not follow a particular method; rather it relies on a willingness to borrow and reconfigure concepts, invent approaches, and create new assemblages that demonstrate a range of analytic practices of thought, creativity, and intervention.

 

-Video by Texas Student Media

POST TAGS:

Terra Ziporyn Snider presents a lecture A Matter of Time: Adolescent Sleep and School Times

Terra Ziporyn Snider, PhD is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of Start School Later, a nonprofit dedicated to increasing public awareness about the relationship between sleep and school hours and to ensuring school start times compatible with health, safety, education, and equity. An award-winning author of numerous popular health and medical books including The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health, The Women’s Concise Guide to Emotional Well-Being, Alternative Medicine for Dummies, and Nameless Diseases and former associate editor at The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), she has written extensively on a wide range of health and medical issues in The Harvard Health Letter, JAMA, The Huffington Post, Consumer Reports, Weight Watchers Magazine, and Business Week, among others. Terra is a graduate of Yale College and a former Searle Fellow at the University of Chicago, where she earned a doctorate in the history of science and medicine. She has been awarded science-writing fellowships by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, and the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole.

Adolescents are a sleep-deprived group, with an estimated 87% of high schoolers getting insufficient sleep on school nights and 40% reporting six or fewer hours. This “teen sleep crisis” is believed to have many causes, including a delay in the circadian rhythm at puberty coupled with school start times requiring early awakening. A compelling body of research shows that these latter two factors account for a significant portion of chronic sleep deprivation in adolescents; in fact, of all the contributing factors proposed, only early school start times have been proven to play a major, and remediable, role. These findings have led to a growing number of calls from health, education, and civic leaders for later school start times, including recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that middle and high schools start class no earlier than 8:30 a.m. Nonetheless, an estimated 85% of U.S. middle and high schools still start class at times out-of-sync with typical adolescent circadian patterns; many start in the 7 a.m. hour or even earlier, with students in some districts required to be at bus stops before 5:30 a.m. After briefly reviewing the history of school bell time changes and recent research about the impact of early bell times on health, safety, school performance, equity, and economics, this talk considers perceived and real obstacles to change, as well as recent lessons from communities that have successfully returned to more developmentally appropriate school hours.

-Video by Texas Student Media

POST TAGS:

Physical Activity and Healthy Eating in Schools

Dr. Bartholomew lectures on the importance of decision making for children in schools. Children are presented with a variety of lunch options with different nutritional values. The way that the food is presented, and the options that are available can have a strong impact on the choices that they make.

Dr. Bartholomew is the director of the Exercise and Sport Psychology Laboratory and chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. His research centers on the impact of exercise on mental health, with a specific interest in the use of single bouts of exercise (aerobic and/or weight lifting) to improve mood and reduce reactivity to stress. His work has recently received funding from the National Institutes of Health. He graduated with a B.A. in Psychology from Harvard University, where he was a three-year letter winner on the varsity football team. He then earned a Ph.D. in Exercise Science with an emphasis in Sport and Exercise Psychology from Arizona State University.

POST TAGS:

Assistant Professor Jessica Toste suggests five simple strategies—from apps to camps—to help students with disabilities avoid learning loss over the summer.

Assistant Professor North Cooc discusses how research, policy, and practice interrelate and can be bolstered to better support the learning of students with disabilities in the summer.

A former special education teacher and high school administrator, Assistant Professor Barbara Pazey shares thoughts about supporting the summer learning of students with disabilities while also serving the needs of schools.

POST TAGS:

 

More than 100 families with children with autism and developmental disabilities have received clinical services from a partnership between the College of Education’s Department of Special Education and Austin Travis County Integral Care (ATCIC). Andrew and his family are one example of the power of the partnership.
 
Audio slideshow: Christina S. Murrey
Narrated by: Taylor Rowland, special education graduate student and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapist
 

The Department of Special Education and Travis County join forces to help families with children with autism

When the College of Education’s Department of Special Education launched a modest partnership with Austin Travis County Integral Care (ATCIC) eight years ago, no one could have foreseen the robust, multi-faceted program it would blossom into by 2014.

“There’s a symbiotic relationship between us and ATCIC that’s been there from the beginning,” said Dr. Mark O’Reilly, chair of the Department of Special Education.

Under O’Reilly’s guidance, the department had recently established one of the first U.S. graduate training programs to specialize in preparing special educators, psychologists, and speech pathologists to work with children with autism and developmental disabilities and their families.

At the same time, ATCIC, a community-based behavioral health and developmental disabilities service provider, was struggling to provide enough board-certified behavior analysts (BCBAs) to serve its growing population of in-need families.

“An efficient and effective training program needs more than just ivory tower instruction. We have to link with those practices and we have to influence the community in positive ways.”

“We reached out to them and they reached out to us,” said O’Reilly. “We thought it would be essential as part of that curriculum to partner with community programs that actually deliver services to families who had children with autism. An efficient and effective training program needs more than just ivory tower instruction. We have to link with those practices and we have to influence the community in positive ways.”

At the outset the terms of the project were limited in scope: ATCIC would fund one University of Texas doctoral student to provide 20 hours a week of behavior supports for program families. Ten hours would be clinical services to families and the other 10 would fund student research.

This was a tall order, considering that challenging behavior and communication issues included potty training, eating difficulties, sensory issues, aggressive behavior, and self-injury.

“He came in and served as many people as he could, working in one little office downstairs,” said Maya Vega ATCIC Director of Intellectual and Developmental Services. “But the services that one UT Austin doctoral candidate was providing for this collaboration were of such high quality that we knew this was a relationship we needed to nourish and continue.”

Since then the Department of Special Education/ATCIC partnership has grown to include several separate and distinct branches that employ the skills of four to five doctoral students and about 10 masters students annually. In the eight years the program has been in place more than 100 children have received services.

“It’s basically four programs,” said Cindy Gevarter, a doctoral student in special education who supervises the program’s recently implemented Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) program. “Behavior supports is where the program initially started. Doc students would go out, write behavior plans and do short-term follow-ups. But now that we have more support we’re able to actually go in to a home setting and teach a family how to implement those behavior plans instead of just saying ‘Here you go.’” The ECI program provides in-home behavior therapy for children ages 0-3.

Now, in addition to the long-standing behavior supports program, the partnership features an Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) autism program, the ECI program, and a social skills program that is geared up to start this spring.

Both the ABA and ECI programs provide children from low-income families with free or reduced-cost behavior services in the home. Both approach therapy in a naturalistic manner, although ECI tends to involve more on-the-go parental interaction.

“With the autism program we do a formal assessment and then put together individualized programs from that assessment,” said Laura Rojeski, a doctoral student in special education and manager of the ABA program. “We might have 10 to 30 goals for a kid depending on his level of functioning, and we’re working on those and taking data on those. We’re always trying to do things in a more naturalistic way, making sure we’re not just sitting at a table, but with our 3-6 year-old population it’s a bit more structured.”

“With the ECI program it’s mandated by law that the parents must be part of the training,” said Gevarter. “It has to be what’s called ‘vetted instruction.’ If the natural routine for mom is to play for 20 minutes, have snack time, and then go outside, we’re following that. We’re not saying to mom, ‘Hey, this is what we’re going to do.’ We’re figuring out how we can work within routines that are already happening.”

The success stories that stem from these programs are manifold.

“We used to not hear from families,” said Vega, “but now we hear from them all the time. We have individuals who are using zero ability to communicate verbally who start working with these clinicians and a few months later they have a vocabulary of 20 words.”

Cassandra Medrano is just one parent who has seen life-changing positive results. Her four-year-old son Andrew has been involved with the ATCIC program for more than a year, and in that time has progressed from being almost completely non-verbal to signing and talking more frequently. Thanks to the hands-on therapy his behavior issues have also quieted.
“He’s actually around other kids without temper tantrums,” said Medrano. “Now he’s side by side with them. He doesn’t lash out. He’s able to attend school and actually sit down for a good five to ten minutes and do activities.”

The relationship O’Reilly describes is beneficial to all involved. ATCIC’s stretched-thin staff gets much-needed support; doctoral students receive leadership and supervision opportunities; masters students gain learning opportunities and a chance to complete work toward their Behavior Analyst Certification; and the Department of Special Education builds research partnerships that help advance the field from an educational perspective. Most important, families struggling with the issue of autism are granted a ray of hope and a measure of success.

“We get excited to see the kids making progress, such as speaking their first word or using a communication device,” said Rojeski. “But sometimes parent’s reaction to that progress is the greatest thing. Seeing how excited the parent becomes when they watch their kid communicate, learn new skills and do something without behavior issues, that’s just incredible.”

In keeping with The University of Texas at Austin’s motto, “What starts here changes the world,” the unique Department of Special Education/ATCIC partnership’s influence has extended well beyond Travis County.

“It’s not just the here and now in terms of training,” said Dr. O’Reilly. “Doctoral students have flown out of here and have been very successful in terms of getting jobs at universities all around the nation and replicating this program.”


Student Spotlight

Interested in learning more about the Department of Special Education? Click here

Early Childhood Education Assistant Professor Jennifer Adair discusses how teachers and administrators can foster children’s natural leadership skills and sense of agency.

Angela Valenzuela, professor in both educational policy and planning and the educational administration departments, challenges educators to rethink hierarchal concepts of leadership and move toward one that incorporates communities and individuals.

Educational Administration Professor Mark Anthony Gooden, director of The University of Texas at Austin Principalship Program, discusses how the program prepares educators to become servant leaders who transform the education landscape.

Associate Professor Jill Marshall, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, discusses “stereotype threat’s” effect on student outcomes, the importance of helping students develop visual-spatial skills, and how reframing the teaching of math and science using project-based approaches can help engage underrepresented students.

Educational Psychology Professor Kevin Cokley explains how “imposter syndrome” can affect underrepresented students in STEM classes and what educators can do to help ward off its negative effects.

Associate Professor and Director of the Center for STEM Education Victor Sampson discusses how science teachers can modify how they teach to better engage every student in learning scientific methods and retaining content.