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Stephanie Cawthon and Carrie Lou Garberoglio are deaf. They have lived the experience—as students and professionals—of working with accommodations and breaking down barriers. Their passion for changing the paradigm of the educational experience in the U.S. for deaf individuals has influenced their work as researchers.

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Portrait of Delida Sanchez

Educational Psychology Assistant Professor Delida Sanchez answers questions about health disparities for underrepresented K-12 students and what educators can do to help.

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Deciding on a career early within the college journey can be a bit like building a road while walking on it. Students may not have the time or support to translate their interests into a viable career option. One way to help ensure a speedy graduation rate is to have

There are noticeable differences in academics and the employment gap that statistics can show between deaf learners and the general population. Stephanie Cawthon of the Department of Educational Psychology discusses the obstacles and attitudes towards deaf learners that influence their outcomes, and what can be done to combat these. This

Kevin Cokley has been honored for his contributions to counseling psychology as well as ethnic minority psychology. He actively shares his knowledge and insights through public writing of op-eds and research-based commentaries.

Here, Erin Rodriguez provides tips to caregivers and teachers to consider for helping children following a natural disaster.

Educational Psychology Professor Kevin Stark and Clinical Assistant Professor Jane Gray are leaders in psychological assessment and treatment of youth in schools. Stark is co-founder of the Texas Child Study Center at Dell Medical Center in Austin, where Gray is director of psychology training

New research shines much-needed light on gay men’s use of Facebook to reveal their sexual identity

Currently, best practices for educating and supporting the educational outcomes of deaf and hard of hearing individuals after high school have not been studied rigorously or shared broadly, which means that uneven outcomes are common. The new center, which launches Jan. 1, aims to change that.

The first Latina and woman of color elected president of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Melba Vasquez surely possesses an above-average skill for leadership.