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“A Hauntology on Data: Diffracting Specters of Racialization Toward an Autopoietic Turn/Overturn”

As Avery Gordon (1997) reminds us, there are already ghosts or hauntings in the seemingly present; what might be understood as an absence of presence, and a complex history and subjectivities. Indeed, the haunting demands sociopolitical significance as Derrida (1994) cogently states it “is necessary to speak of the ghost, indeed to the ghost and with it” … “in the name of justice.” In this talk, Dr. Dixon-Román will begin by providing some theoretical articulations of, to, and with, the ghosts of data assemblages. While in the computational turn there has been increasingly more theorizing on data (de Freitas, Dixon-Román, & Lather, 2016; Gitelman, 2013; Kitchin, 2014), few have focused their examination on the sociopolitical forces imbued in data. In recent work, Dixon-Román (in press) has engaged Sylvia Wynter’s (2001, 2007) theories of power, inheritance, and the human in order to theoretically examine and postulate the ways in which the assemblages of data become haunted by sociopolitical relations of racialization. Dixon-Román will engage, in this talk, new materialisms and black literary feminists in order to develop a process of social inquiry that conjures and speaks of, to, and with the ghosts of data assemblages in order to move toward address/redress and reconstitute the human.

Dr. Ezekiel Dixon-Román is an associate professor in the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania. His scholarship focuses on the cultural studies of education, quantification, and social policy. He maintains a program of research that philosophically rethinks and reconceptualizes the use of quantitative methods from a critical theoretical lens (broadly conceived), particularly for the study of the biopolitics of human learning and development. Dr. Dixon-Román has published in leading social science, education, and cultural studies journals such as The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Transforming Anthropology, Urban Education, Teachers College Record, and Cultural Studies-Critical Methodologies. Dr. Dixon-Román co-edited Thinking Comprehensively About Education: Spaces of Educative Possibility and Their Implications for Public Policy (Routledge, 2012), “Alternative Ontologies of Number: Rethinking the Quantitative in Computational Culture” (Cultural Studies-Critical Methodologies, 2016), and “The computational turn in education research: Critical and creative perspectives on the digital data deluge” (Research in Education, 2017). He’s also the author of Inheriting Possibility: Social Reproduction & Quantification in Education (University of Minnesota Press, 2017).

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“Navigating the quicksand: How postsecondary administrators understand the influence of affirmative action developments on racial diversity work.”

Liliana M. Garces is associate professor at The University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy and affiliate faculty at the University of Texas School of Law. Her scholarship, focused on the dynamics of law and educational policy, examines access, diversity, and equity policies for underserved populations in higher education and the use and influence of research in law.

Many postsecondary institutions respond to a legal and policy environment that seeks to end the consideration of race in education policies by adopting race-neutral policies and practices in admissions. Meanwhile institutions have remained publicly committed to racial and ethnic diversity and to promoting inclusive learning environments. In this talk, Dr. Garces discusses how their research findings point to the importance of intentional efforts to implement diversity policy through a race- and racism-conscious lens, develop narratives that counter distorted narratives about racial discrimination, and address legal terms and definitions that do not reflect a realistic understanding of inequality or discrimination.

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Scientific Integrity and Developmental Science: Increasing the Power of Our Science

Dr. Davis-Kean is Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan, where she directs the Human Development and Quantitative Methods Lab. She is both a methodologist and substantive researcher. Her research focuses on the various pathways that the socio-economic status (SES) of parents relates to the cognitive/achievement outcomes of their children. Her primary focus is on parental educational attainment and how it can influence the development of the home environment throughout childhood, adolescence, and the transition to adulthood. Davis-Kean is also a Research Professor at the Institute for Social Research where she is the Program Director of the Population, Neurodevelopment, and Genetics (PNG) program. This collaboration examines the complex transactions of brain, biology, and behavior as children and families develop across time. She is interested in how both the micro (brain and biology) and macro (family and socioeconomic conditions) aspects of development relate to cognitive changes in children across the lifespan.

Secondary data analysis of large longitudinal and national data sets is a standard method used in many social sciences to answer complex questions regarding behavior. In this talk, Dr. Davis-Kean will detail the advantages of using these data sets to study education and health questions across the lifespan. First, she will provide an overview of how using secondary data can increase studies’ scientific integrity. Then, she will detail where and how data sets can be obtained that answer specific questions. Finally, she will discuss methodological issues related to using longitudinal, population data sets. These data sets can enhance science and test theories by increasing the rigor and generalizability of research to the general population, making secondary data analysis an important method to consider.

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Ed Talk with Sarah Powell – Early Math Predicts Later Math: Implications for Intervention

Across grade levels, early math performance predicts later math performance. For example, math performance in kindergarten predicts end-of-year math performance in grades 1, 3, 5, and 8. What does this mean for educators? Educators need to assess students early and regularly to identify students that may need additional math support. Educators also need to provide intervention support early and regularly. With early assessment and intervention, it is possible to change the math pathways for students.

Successful performance in mathematics (i.e., math) requires an understanding of numbers, the quantities represented by numbers, counting, and comparison of amounts. Math also requires an understanding of the concepts of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and algorithms for quickly solving such problems. Students must be able to apply their calculation and computation skills to math problems featuring fractions, decimals, percentages, measurement, and algebra. Additionally, students must be familiar with geometric shapes and concepts, as well as positive and negative numbers. Students begin learning math informally as babies and toddlers, and as students learn more about math as they age, these math skills set the stage for later success with math.

Math performance is directly related to employment opportunities in adulthood (Murnane, Willett, Braatz, & Duhaldeborde, 2001), and math outcomes are as important as reading outcomes for success in school. For these reasons, it is necessary to understand how early in a student’s school career educators can identify students who struggle with math in order to provide proper instruction and support. Without identification and support, students may continue to struggle with math throughout middle school and high school. Additionally, difficulty with math may influence college decisions and workforce placement.

Read Powell’s full summary of Trajectories of Mathematics Performance: From Preschool to Postsecondary

 

Janelle Scott is an associate professor at UC-Berkeley in the Graduate School of Education and the Department of African American Studies. Her research explores the relationship between education, policy, and equality of opportunity. It centers on three related policy strands: the racial politics of public education, the politics of school choice, marketization and privatization, and the role of elite and community-based advocacy in shaping public education.

Jennifer Keys Adair, Ph,D., is an Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education at The University of Texas at Austin. Adair works with parents, teachers, administrators and young children to offer more dynamic and sophisticated learning experiences to children from resilient, marginalized communities in the US and globally. Her areas of expertise include early childhood education for children of immigrants, project-based learning, and the importance of young children recognizing racial discrimination and valuing cultural differences. Dr. Adair is a former Young Scholars Fellow with the Foundation for Child Development and a current Spencer Foundation major grant recipient.

Dr. Adair has published in numerous journals including Harvard Educational Review, Race, Ethnicity and Education and Teachers College Record. She conducts research and lectures in multiple countries, most recently in Austin as part of Blackademics and SXSWedu. Jennifer’s work and expertise can also be found in a variety of news outlets including The Conversation, Washington Post, CNN, and National Public Radio.

This talk considers learning as “opportunities” that are constructed in and translated through white supremacy. Using an historical interrogation provided by the work of Charles Mills, Adair argues that although learning and development are presented as an amoral, biological or even constructivist set of events, their application to children’s lives is one of constructing and reifying personhood and subpersonhood along racial lines.

Using interview data with young children, teachers, and directors in Texas and the particular case of the “word gap” argument, Adair shows how denying children of color certain learning experiences is often justified by a perceived “lack of development.” This denial then prevents children from demonstrating capabilities and contributes to blaming/changing children and families rather than supporting cultural communities and improving institutions and systems.

There are noticeable differences in academics and the employment gap that statistics can show between deaf learners and the general population. Stephanie Cawthon of the Department of Educational Psychology discusses the obstacles and attitudes towards deaf learners that influence their outcomes, and what can be done to combat these. This Ed Talk examines the tyranny of low expectations and the importance of understanding root causes when working to reduce inequities in education.

Stephanie Cawthon investigates issues of equity and access in education from multiple vantage points. Cawthon is a national expert on issues related to standardized assessment and students who are deaf or hard of hearing, particularly in the context of accountability reforms such as No Child Left Behind. She is the Associate Director for Research and Evidence Synthesis at pepnet2, a Technical Assistance and Dissemination project that serves individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Cawthon explores assessment issues such as the effects of accommodations or item modifications on test scores for students with disabilities and English Language Learners.

Dissemination-Implementation science has emerged over the past decade replete with conceptual models and studies of barriers to the successful implementation of evidence-based programs. This work has been of limited usefulness to state systems that are undergoing massive changes due to changes in the healthcare system. These changes target accountability, costs, and outcomes of state services. In the rush by state health and behavioral health authorities to accommodate these changes, services for children and adolescents are being largely overlooked. Yet ironically the most direct way to address system problems is through redesign of prevention and intervention services for children. This entails closing the gap between evidence-based care and its implementation in real world settings. A body of research is emerging that identifies system-level, organizational-level, and individual-level (child and family) interventions that can dramatically improve services and outcomes for children and adolescents. Approaches include evidence-based framing, strategic collaborative interventions, quality metrics, and data driven feedback systems. In her talk, Dr. Hoagwood will provide examples of each and recommend a research agenda to accelerate practical progress.

Dr. Kimberly Hoagwood is the Cathy and Stephen Graham Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry and the Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Hoagwood is the Director and Principal Investigator of the IDEAS Center, an Advanced Center on Implementation and Dissemination Science in States for Children and Families, located at New York University and funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). She also has a joint position with the division of Children, Youth and Families at the New York State Office of Behavioral health (NYSOMH) as a Research Scientist. Previously, Dr. Hoagwood was Professor of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry at Columbia University, where she served as the Acting Director of the Division of Services and Health Policy Research. Prior to her appointment at Columbia University, she was the Associate Director for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research at NIMH, overseeing the portfolio of research on child and adolescent behavioral health, and she served as the Scientific Editor for the Office of the Surgeon General’s National Action Agenda on Children’s Mental Health. She has continuously received federal and state funding over the course of her academic career, has published over 150 peer-reviewed research articles, and is the editor of numerous books on child behavioral health interventions and services research.

-Video by Texas Student Media

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Thinking with Theory: A New Analytic for Qualitative Inquiry

Dr. Alecia Youngblood Jackson is Professor of Educational Research at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC – where she is also affiliated faculty in the Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies program at ASU. Dr. Jackson’s research interests bring feminist, poststructural, and posthuman theories of power/knowledge, language, materiality, and subjectivity to bear on a range of overlapping topics: deconstructions of narrative and voice; conceptual analyses of resistance, freedom, and agency in girls’ and women’s lives; and qualitative analysis in the “posts.” Her work, particularly in collaboration with Lisa Mazzei, seeks to animate philosophical frameworks in the production of the new. She was a keynote speaker at the Summer Institute for Qualitative Research at Manchester Metropolitan University in July 2013, and she was the invited speaker for Louisiana State University’s Curriculum Camp in February 2015. She has publications in The International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Qualitative Inquiry, The International Review of Qualitative Research, Qualitative Research, Gender and Education, and numerous book chapters. She is the author, with Lisa Mazzei, of Thinking with Theory in Qualitative Research (2012), and editor, with Lisa Mazzei, of Voice in Qualitative Inquiry (2009).

In my talk, I situate my collaborate work with Lisa Mazzei, which we call thinking with theory, not as a method with a script, but as a new analytic for qualitative inquiry. This new analytic works within and against the truths of humanist, conventional, and interpretive forms of inquiry and analysis that have centered and dominated qualitative research texts and practices. I will discuss how there is no formula for thinking with theory: it is something that is to come; something that happens, paradoxically, in a moment that has already happened; something emergent, unpredictable, and always re-thinkable and re-doable. Discussing his power/knowledge analysis, Foucault (2000) explained, “What I’ve written is never prescriptive either for me or for others — at most it’s instrumental and tentative” (p. 240). Following Foucault, I will argue that thinking with theory does not follow a particular method; rather it relies on a willingness to borrow and reconfigure concepts, invent approaches, and create new assemblages that demonstrate a range of analytic practices of thought, creativity, and intervention.

 

-Video by Texas Student Media

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