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As we close out Black History Month, it’s an important opportunity to take a look at examples of the work our faculty have done to expand research and support the success of African American students at all grade levels.

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Students listening to a reading exercise.

Pre-service teachers use read-alouds to promote anti-racist curriculum. “I like to read about people different from me because I get to learn about different cultures,” says one student.

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As we close out Black History Month, it’s an important opportunity to take a look at examples of the work our faculty have done to expand research and support the success of African American students at all grade levels.

Pre-service teachers use read-alouds to promote anti-racist curriculum. “I like to read about people different from me because I get to learn about different cultures,” says one student.

Join Special Education Clinical Assistant Professor Katie Tackett for this Discovery Minute as she describes how applying universal design principles to her classroom benefits all her students, whether or not they have an identified disability.

Melissa Wetzel, associate professor of language and literacy, shares research-based ideas about the literacy “crisis” and how understanding diverse literacies is a stronger educational approach.

Because of the foundational importance of literacy to education, teachers are increasingly expected to integrate reading across various subjects, including science. But choosing appropriate texts can be a challenge for teachers, who may not be well-versed in how to critically evaluate them.

In “Bridging the Political Divide: Educators on the Front Line," Soto spoke directly to over 100 educators in attendance about how what happens in their classrooms can help bridge a widening political and societal divide.

UT College of Education interviewed a few of teachers' most important stakeholders to see what they have to say about their teachers' performance. K-12 students chime in with some advice for new teachers to help them connect with their students.

Jennifer Keys Adair, Ph,D., is an Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education at The University of Texas at Austin. Adair works with parents, teachers, administrators and young children to offer more dynamic and sophisticated learning experiences to children from resilient, marginalized communities in the US and globally. Her areas of

Here, Erin Rodriguez provides tips to caregivers and teachers to consider for helping children following a natural disaster.

Special education researchers are conducting a project using data as a reading fluency intervention.